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The Beaches and Bar destinations, the place to party

For those who love the beach, and want to party, there are many options to enjoy on the beach.

For many sun seekers, visiting the beach is the reason they go on vacation. Sitting by the ocean with your feet in the sand is the hallmark of relaxation for many of us – especially over the past few years.

Beaches are love! The soft sand under your feet, the breeze running through your hair, the waves bringing sea shells on the shore and the open sky playing with shades of orange and blue. Beach bars are even greater! The soft sand under your unsober feet, the breeze running through your drunk hair, the waves bringing the most fascinating sea shells to the shore and the open sky soothing your high soul.

“Although last year was still far from ‘normal,’ these are the beaches travellers visited and loved more than any others,” said Christine Maguire, VP, Global Media Business at Tripadvisor. “Whether you’re looking for a trip where you can continue to social distance outdoors, or are comfortable heading to spring break, beaches are the perfect place to be in 2022.

Sparkling sands, cool sea breeze, beautiful waves, delectable seafood and lots of vitamin D – a beach vacation is all that and more! And considering that India has a long coastline, there are many beautiful beach destinations you can head to for a relaxing as well as adventurous holiday. Laze around, go for strolls, click fabulous pictures, collect shells, or get your adrenaline pumping with fun water sports.

Goa is one of the most popular beach destinations in the country, thanks to the many breathtaking beaches it has. Apart from the golden sands, palm and coconut trees and delectable seafood, the beaches here are famous for hosting thrilling water sports and amazing late-night parties.

Goa’s Bar Tesouro, emerged as India’s Best Bar for 2021. Tesouro (which means treasure or treasury in Portuguese), is flanked by Fire Fly in the otherwise serene Colva beach in South Goa. Over the last two years, it has gone on to become one of the most talked about drinking holes in the country, much loved for its cocktails including the famous Midnight Brekkie (made using gin, vermouth, watermelon, peanut butter, and strawberry compote). The bar was founded by Donovan Vaz, scion of a Goa liquor distribution family, who quit his racing car career to become a restaurateur, along with mixologist Arijit Bose.

Bar Tesouro’s ascension is part of the surging popularity of Goan bars over the last few years. As many as four others including Escobar, Miguel’s, Gunpowder, and For The Record Vinyl Bar made into the Top 30 bars list for 2021. Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore each have six bars each in the list. Kolkata has four, Gurgaon three, and Pune and Hyderabad have one bar each.

Surrounded by Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, Andaman and Nicobar Islands are among the finest beach destinations in India. Pristine blue waters, sparkling silky sands and lush green vegetation attract beach lovers in droves. Besides relaxing in beach cottages, huts and shacks, and soaking in natural beauty, adventure enthusiasts can try different water sports here.

Lakshadweep, the smallest union territory in India, has 36 islands and some of the most stunning beaches. Apart from unique natural beauty, the islands have many amazing spots that attract tourists from far and wide.

Located about 140 km from Goa, Gokarna is perfect for those looking for something offbeat. The beaches here are beautiful, calm as well as affordable. The serene surroundings, coupled with many fun activities, make Gokarna one of the best beach destinations in India.

A popular beach destination near Goa, Karwar is a must-visit. The coastal town is located at the confluence of the Arabian Sea and River Kali. Tall palm trees, golden sands and pristine waters accentuate the beauty of the beaches here and make them ideal for nature lovers and peace seekers.

Popularly known as the ‘Queen of the Arabian Sea’, Kochi or Cochin is one of the best beach destinations in India. This small coastal city is peppered with picturesque beaches that serve as perfect retreat from urban din.

Dotted with beautiful palm-lined beaches, the union territory Daman and Diu is a popular getaway in the western part of India. It is located near Gujarat and frequented by those seeking peace and quiet. The horse-shoe shaped Nagoa Beach in Diu is one of the best beaches for swimming in India.

Located on the shore of Bay of Bengal, Puri is known for some of the best beaches in India. Puri Beach is especially known for its wild waves.

Mahabalipuram majorly famous for its ancient temples and UNESCO World Heritage Sites, this historical town in South India is also one of the best beach destinations in India. Mahabalipuram lies on the shore of the Bay of Bengal and is a popular weekend getaway for people in Chennai, thanks to its proximity to the city.

Marina Beach, which is the longest beach in India and the second-longest in the world, is in Chennai. The sight of the evening sun from the beach, slowly disappearing into the ocean, is an awesome experience.

One of the four metropolis siblings of India, Chennai was known for being cautious about adopting the ever-popular trend of catering to the new age party-goers as the rest of India. But as the years went by in the last decade, Chennai became a hub for a multicultural and more importantly a very hardworking workforce of Indian youth. To meet their needs of letting loose after a hard day’s of work, a lot of pubs, clubs and bars – both fancy and commonplace now dot the capital city of Tamil Nadu.

Visakhapatnam, popularly known as Vizag, is one of the best beach destinations in India. The city is located on the east coast and boasts pristine seashores, sparkling blue waters and lush greenery.

Boasting a long coastline with many serene beaches, Mumbai is a delightful destination for travel enthusiasts. Juhu Beach, one of the most famous beaches in India, is in the heart of Mumbai.

The darling city of high-end parties, nights refuse to fizzle out here in this cosmopolitan giant. The city is especially known for the Hindi film industry, Bollywood. Juhu and Bandra are two of the most important spots where the crowd comes to every night, but other than these there are other parts of the city where partying is an option.

Located on the Konkan coastline, Ganpatipule is one of the best beach destinations in India for nature lovers and serenity seekers. The town has a long shoreline with many pristine beaches.

Kolkata is a wonderful destination for different kinds of travellers. And if you love beaches, this populous metro city has some beautiful ones along its 158 km long coastline.

Once known as the party capital of India, the party spirit of Kolkata took a hit after several political uprisings in 2010. However, it is only for so long that you can put a cap on the nightlife of Kolkata. Kolkata now hosts a range of artistic bars, old-school restaurants and gorgeous Instagram-able cafes. The city’s vibrancy of culture, art and history is so unique to Kolkata that can’t be seen anywhere else in India. So let your hair down and paint the town red in this beautiful city of artists and dreamers!

Fondly known as Pondi or Pondy, Pudducherry (formerly Pondicherry) is a little town with a big heart. Formerly a French colony, this beach town is known for its calm vibes, low cost liquor and delectable cuisine. Groups of friends, couples, old timers and small and large families alike, take to the streets and sit by Promenade Beach to watch the waves crash at the shore. The plethora of street food carts stationed across the town cater to the hungry mouths after sundown.

In terms of nightclubs, the city does have many to offer as it still continues to grow in that regard. And almost all of them strictly function only till midnight. But many backpacker friendly hostels and stays allow their patrons to party later than midnight and have a great time.

This small and serene union territory is known for some of the best beaches in India for honeymooners. You can unwind on the popular beaches here and spend quality time with your partner.

Delhi govt. allows city bars to stay open till 3 am

With Delhi showing the way will Mumbai follow suit. Perhaps the commercial capital of India will want the city to mix business with pleasure. Additional taxes will help boost the government finances.

The Delhi government has granted permission to all pubs and restaurants serving liquor to stay open till 3am — a move aimed at elevating the Capital’s nightlife, which could help revive the hospitality industry that is still reeling from the pandemic, and increasing employment opportunities.

A formal order is likely to be issued soon, people familiar with the matter said, adding that the government is coordinating with Delhi Police and other agencies for the safe implementation of the new timings. Most pubs and restaurants, barring some exceptions, are currently allowed to stay open till 1am.

Though Delhi’s new excise policy was implemented on November 17, 2021, the change in operating hours will not kick in until a specific order is issued. Though Delhi’s new excise policy was implemented on November 17, 2021, the change in operating hours will not kick in until a specific order is issued.

The Delhi government has granted permission to all pubs and restaurants serving liquor to stay open till 3 am — a move aimed at elevating the Capital’s nightlife, giving a shot in the arm to the hospitality industry that is still reeling from the pandemic, and increasing employment opportunities.

Zorawar Kalra, MD, Massive Restaurants says that it will have a huge positive impact on the entire industry and the economy of the city as all stakeholders will benefit.

The government benefits due to added tax and excise collections. The employees benefit due to added shifts requiring additional people. The customers benefit as they get vibrant nightlife and the freedom to dine at whatever time they choose. And the industry benefits due to the potential of added revenue.

Abhinav Jindal, CEO & Founder, Kimaya Himalayan Beverages had this to say “Delhi Government’s recent announcement for restaurants and bars to remain open till 3 am is an appreciated move showcasing Delhi as a progressive city on the world map. We welcome this decision as a part of the industry.

This cosmopolitan city will allow people to enjoy themselves at their convenience without rushing due to time restrictions. Moreover, it will not only encourage and provide ease of doing business in the city, but will also add up to the revenues of the hard-hit HORECA industry which sees newer opportunities after two years of the pandemic.

In addition to this, this will also help us all promote responsible drinking among consumers. They will not be under the pressure of finishing drinks, rather enabling them to enjoy for longer hours and responsibly. Further enhancing experience for consumers and industry. Look forward to witnessing this positive change in Delhi’s nightlife!”

In an official government note, deputy chief minister Manish Sisodia, who holds the excise portfolio, asked the department recently to extend the closing time of restaurants, and to ensure that no establishment is subjected to harassment if it stays open till 3am.

“As part of our policy of ease of doing business and also to bring some cultural and nightlife activity in the national capital, which will further enhance the employment opportunity of our people, the Delhi government approved the New Excise Policy in November 2021 allowing the operating timings of restaurants up to 3am in consonance with the operational timings of NCR cities including Gurugram and Noida. The final implementation is being coordinated with the other agencies including Delhi Police,” read the file noting signed by Manish Sisodia.

“In the meantime, the excise department of Delhi, for all practical purposes, [is] to consider the closing time of restaurants as 3am, and no restaurant will be subject to any harassment on account of operation up to 3am,” the note added.

Among NCR cities, Gurugram allowed pubs to remain open 24×7 while in Noida, pubs can operate till 2am. In Gurugram, pubs were allowed to allowed to open till 6 am last year but the new policy announced by the Haryana government allows such outlets to remain open 24×7. In Noida, since April 2019, all pubs can operate till 1am and this can be extended to 2 am for a fee.

Though Delhi’s new excise policy was implemented on November 17, 2021, the change in operating hours will not kick in until a specific order is issued. For example, another key change in the policy — lowering the drinking age from 25 to 21 — is yet to be implemented because the Delhi government is yet to amend the Delhi Excise Act.

While Delhi Police has not issued an official response, a senior officer said they were not aware of any such order yet. “The Delhi government has not consulted with the Delhi Police while issuing the said order. When the order was notified, the Delhi Police had raised concerns related to law and order, traffic disorder, as well as safety and security of citizens, especially women,” said a senior officer, who is aware of the matter.

There have been demands to extend the operating hours since the excise policy was implemented last November, and a group of representatives of the National Restaurant Association of India met Sisodia recently to urge the government to push the change through.

“Restaurants have already paid the excise fee as per the new policy, but continue to be restricted to the old operating timings – leading to huge business losses in this critical recovery phase for the industry. Non-implementation of this most important change is putting the industry into much deeper distress than before. This will surely negate the gains that are expected from the reforms undertaken by the Delhi government,” said the NRAI representation submitted to Sisodia.

According to Rahul Singh, trustee of NRAI, restaurants not serving liquor in Delhi are allowed to operate 24 hours if they so choose, but restaurants serving liquor operate with an L-17 licence, which only permits the service of liquor in independent restaurants till 1 am.

To be sure, the 24-hour service of liquor is allowed in restaurants inside five-star hotels, and those located in the arrival or departure terminals of IGI airport.

Restaurants serving liquor in Delhi need multiple licences from different agencies to operate in Delhi, but only the excise and police licences specify timing restrictions. The health, and shop and establishment licences given by the municipal corporations, the food safety licence given by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India, and the fire licence given by Delhi Fire Services, don’t have any timing specifications.

Restaurateurs welcomed the Delhi government’s move

“Delhi is truly a world city, the capital of our nation, and the most visited city too. Tourists as well as the residents truly deserve a global experience. With longer office working hours and the commute, there is always a paucity of time for patrons to have a relaxed evening. Extending service of liquor in a restaurant will provide relief from binge drinking. This will increase jobs in the hospitality sector, and more revenues to the city’s exchequer. While some will question the law-and-order aspects, one has to realise that when there are people on the street and the city is vibrant, there is less crime. Look at examples of global cities and even our own airports, railway stations which operate 24/7,” NRAI’s Rahul Singh said.

Sanjeev Mehra, president of Khan Market Traders’ Association, however, cautioned against the move. “It will also not lead to any increase in business for many of the regular traders and shop owners. But the move will definitely put additional burden on Delhi Police, which is already overburdened, and may lead to increase in law-and-order issues,” he said.

Meanwhile, the BJP slammed the Delhi government’s move. “The new excise policy is going to destroy the future of Delhi’s youth. Permitting restaurants to serve liquor till 3am is nothing but promoting use of alcohol among people. It may also lead to law-and-order situation in the capital,” said Ramvir Singh Bidhuri, leader of opposition in Delhi assembly. Delhi satellites Noida and Gurugram come under Uttar Pradesh and Haryana respectively, and both states are ruled by the BJP.

Punjab looking at different state excise policies, to shore up exchequer

The newly formed Punjab government of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) is contemplating upon allotting liquor vends through a tender system in its bid to shore up revenues from excise. However, the traders are not open to this idea and want continuation of draw of lots. In Delhi where AAP has been ruling the new excise policy has been welcomed not just by the industry, but also consumers. The Minister of Finance, Harpal Singh Cheema has directed officials to study excise policies of other states and plans to roll out the policy soon. Punjab is likely to pick up inputs from Delhi and other states before it announces a new excise policy for 2022-23 sometime in June to be effective from July 1. The excise department has already initiated informal discussions with the trade to understand their requirements while boosting the exchequer.

Like many states, Punjab’s major source of revenue is from excise. It has estimated the revenues for the current financial year at ₹7,002 crores, with an increase of 20% from ₹5,794 crores of 2020-21. According to media reports, the excise department has already achieved the revenue target for 2021-22.

In end March, the AAP government renewed the 2021-22 policy for a period of three months to those existing licensees who will give 1.75% excess revenue over minimum guaranteed revenue (MGR) of financial year 2021-22 for their respective groups and zones in order to maintain stability in the liquor trade. The minimum guaranteed revenue of groups and zones is estimated at ₹1,440.96 crores for this three month window and the revenue target is expected to be ₹1,910 crores.

The MGQ of Punjab made liquor (PML) called desi, Indian made foreign liquor (IMFL), beer and imported foreign liquor (IFL) of each group and zone has been increased by 10% of the corresponding first quarter of last financial year of the respective group and zone. Further, to allow retail licensees to lift liquor as per their requirement, the amount of additional fixed license fee has also been increased. The ratio of fixed and open quota of PML shall be 30:70 as was prevalent during financial year 2021-22.

It may be mentioned here that the government of Capt. Amarinder Singh had allotted vends through a draw of lots till 2019-20 and in the last two years it extended the trade licenses of those who guaranteed generating 12% excess revenue over the fixed minimum guaranteed revenue. It is learnt that the government is planning to increase the reserve price and license fee of liquor vends and also to increase the size of the group up to ₹20 crore, having 7 to 10 vends.

The government is on a mission mode to fill the coffers. The Finance Minister is on record stating that despite high liquor consumption in the state, it has been able to generate enough for the exchequer. “This is our mission now. We have to fill the coffers.” While lauding the Delhi excise policy, the Minister talked about basic difference between liquor consumers in Delhi and Punjab. “While Delhi consumes Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL), Punjabis consume Punjab Medium Liquor (PML). We will have to work out our policy taking into consideration all these points.”

AAP national convenor and Delhi Chief Minister, Arvind Kejriwal had stated during the run up to the election that the AAP government would look at liquor and sand for generating funds.

Methanol in wine

Greg Hodson1, Eric Wilkes2, Sara Azevedo1 and Tony Battaglene1

1 – FIVS, 18 rue d’Aguesseau, 75008 Paris, France

2 – Australian Wine Research Institute, Hartley Grove, Urrbrae SA 5064, Australia

Abstract

This paper examines the origins of methanol in grape wine and the quantities typically found in it, as well as in other foods such as unpasteurised fruit juices. The toxicology of methanol and the associated regulatory limits established by competent authorities in various parts of the world are also considered. It is concluded that such limits are not driven by public health considerations and thus authorities are requested to consider the need for methanol analyses to be performed and reported on certificates of analysis as a condition of market entry for wine. Where methanol limits are still deemed to be necessary to achieve policy objectives, authorities are encouraged to establish them in the light of the levels of methanol typically found in grape wines produced by the full array of internationally permitted winemaking practices, and to consider harmonising their limits with those that have already been established by other governments or recommended by appropriate intergovernmental organisations.

© The Authors, published by EDP Sciences 2017

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

  1. Introduction

The origin and significance of methanol in wine, and the associated establishment of regulatory limits for its presence there, are causes of much confusion and misunderstanding in international trade. This paper, produced by the FIVS Scientific and Technical Committee, reviews the topic in some detail, providing reference materials to assist with further study. It concludes that the levels of methanol commonly found in grape wines are broadly similar to those that may be found in many freshly squeezed and unpasteurised fruit juices if they are stored for a period of time after squeezing. It is further demonstrated, from a comparison of regulatory limits for methanol in wine with food safety risk assessments that have been conducted by reputable bodies, that the limits themselves do not serve any real food safety purpose. This is because many litres of wine per day or even per hour would need to be consumed (even if the product contained the highest content of methanol permissible in regulations) to even approach intake levels of any known toxicological concern [1].

2. Chemical properties and other information for methanol

Methanol is chemically characterized as follows [2]:

2.1. Chemical Formula, Synonyms, CAS Registry number

Chemical formula: CH3OH

Synonyms: Methyl alcohol, Carbinol, Wood alcohol

CAS Registry Number: 67-56-1.

2.2. Physico-chemical properties

Physical appearance: Methanol is a colourless liquid with characteristic odour.

Melting Point: –98 °C

Boiling Point: 65 °C

Solubility in water: Miscible.

3. Origin of Methanol in wine

3.1. Action of pectinase enzymes

3.1.1. Action of endogenous pectinase enzymes on pectin in grapes

Methanol is produced before and during alcoholic fermentation from the hydrolysis of pectins by pectinase enzymes (such as pectin methylesterase) which are naturally present in the fruit. More methanol is produced when must is fermented on grape skins; hence there is generally more in red wines than in rosé or white wines (see Sect. 4 below).

3.1.2. Use of exogenous pectinase enzymes in winemaking

Exogenous pectinase enzymes are permitted for use in winemaking (generally as clarifying agents) in at least the following countries: Australia, Canada, the 28 Member States of the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Georgia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States. Their use is also deemed to be an acceptable winemaking practice by the International Organisation for Vine and Wine (OIV) [3]. As with the activity of pectinases naturally present in grapes, the use of exogenous pectinases as a winemaking practice will have the effect of increasing the levels of methanol in the resulting wine.

3.2. Treatment of wine with Dimethyldicarbonate

Dimethyldicarbonate (DMDC) is an effective pre-bottling sterilant, accepted for use in winemaking in Argentina, Australia, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, the 28 Member States of the European Union, the Republic of Georgia, Hong Kong China, Myanmar, New Zealand, Russia, Singapore, South Africa, Thailand, Turkey and the United States, whose use is generally limited in international regulations and recommendations to a maximum treatment of 200 mg/L of wine [4]. For other alcoholic beverages and mixtures of alcoholic and other beverages with an alcoholic strength by volume of less than 15%, the limit on usage is often set at 250 mg/L. The use of DMDC can be important in stabilizing lower alcohol products from additional fermentation in the bottle, and also allows a reduction in the quantity of sulphur dioxide that is used where the oxygen in wine is kept below 1 mg/L. DMDC breaks down rapidly in wine, producing carbon dioxide and leaving methanol at very low levels not harmful to health and other innocuous products in the wine. Methanol at a level of about 100 mg/L is created in wine from a DMDC treatment at the typical maximum treatment level of 200 mg/L [5].

4. Typical levels of methanol in wine

It was noted above that the presence of low levels of methanol in wine is expected due to the action of pectinase enzymes that are naturally present in the grapes. A study of the literature indicates the following information concerning the typical levels of methanol that may be found in wine (these levels generally do not account for any additional amount that may result from a DMDC treatment):

• Red wines will tend to contain more methanol (between 120 and 250 mg/L of the total wine volume) than white wines (between 40 and 120 mg/L of the total wine volume), because of the longer exposure to grape skins during the fermentation [6].

• Wines made from grapes that have been exposed to Botrytis cinerea (e.g. late harvest wines, such as Sauternes or Tokay) also have higher methanol levels than standard grape wines (as much as 364 mg/L of the total wine volume) [7].

• Wines made from non Vitis vinifera grapes tend to contain more methanol than wine from pure Vitis vinifera [8].

4.1. Case study: Typical levels of methanol in Australian wine

A recent survey looked at 150 wines from across Australia to determine typical levels of methanol in commercial wine [9]. The sample set consisted of 90 red and 60 white wines from multiple varieties and vintages. All wines were analysed using a GC-FID in the Australian Wine Research Institute’s ISO 17025 accredited laboratory. No evidence of DMDC treatment (a source of methanol) was found for any of the wines tested.

Typical ranges for methanol found in Australian wines were; 60–280 mg/L in reds (mean 170 mg/L) and 40–120 mg/L in whites (mean 58 mg/L). All wines tested had some methanol content. The main driver for higher methanol levels appeared to be skin contact during processing. Variety or vintage had no significant impact.

4.1.1. Typical values

Results for red and white wines were significantly different. Red wines typically contained higher levels of methanol across a larger range of content, reflecting greater variation in skin contact times. All wines were found to be within Australian and OIV guidelines (Fig. 1).

Figure 1

4.1.2. Impact of variety

No significant differences of methanol content were found based on grape variety. The only difference found was between red and white wines, reflecting the differences in processing for the different wine styles (Fig. 2). 4.1.3. Impact of vintage

Figure 2

4.1.3. Impact of vintage

Figure 3

No significant impact of year of production on the methanol concentration was found (Fig. 3).

Ankur Jain’s unique strategies and products are changing the beer narrative in India

The Indian beer market was valued at approximately 371 billion in 2020, with projections estimated at around 662 billion by 2026 at a CAGR of 9.2% from 2022 to 2027. This impressive growth rate is a factor of changing consumption trends and the evolving tastes of India’s growing urban population. To keep up, manufacturers of brands must continue to evolve and push the boundaries in their efforts to deliver beer products that are acceptable and enduring.

At the heart of the beer revolution in India is Bira 91’s Ankur Jain. When he decided to establish a unique, local Indian brewery in 2015, it wasn’t necessarily to rival the more established brands like Kingfisher, or the more global varieties like Heineken and Carlsberg, but to simply create a space where beer is worth drinking and one that represents the vibrancy, strength, and spirit of the Indian people and heritage.

“I sold my healthcare start-up in 2007 and decided to move back to India. It dawned on me at the time that there was simply no beer worth drinking. We lacked frothy and heavy beers and I only wanted to solve the problem. We began by importing craft beers from Brooklyn and sold them in India. These were Brooklyn-brewed brands like Duvel, Chimay, and so on,” he says. The reception was good, but Jain knew there was so much more to be done if the desire was to bring quality brews to India.

Himself a late beer bloomer, Jain was more of a malt and wine guy in the early years of adult life. After he moved to Brooklyn to set up his health start-up and occupied an office next to an iconic brewery, the beer fever caught up with him. Today, he’s become a beer fanatic after many years of sampling new brands and flavours. He believes everyone just needs that first taste of awesomeness to fall in love, and that’s what Bira 91 set out to do.

Jain’s dive into the world of beers wasn’t without some hiccups and opposition, even among members of his family. His father, a respected retired architect who was in the Central Public Works Department for 35 years, wasn’t exactly excited about his son’s new found love. But that, perhaps, was the kind of drive Jain needed to succeed. He says not speaking properly to his father for almost five years gave him room and the freedom to properly explore his imagination and craft.

In its first year of operation, Bira was brewed in Belgium’s Flander’s region before production was moved to India for its #MadeInIndia journey. A couple of seed funding and angel investments later – from entities like Sequoia Capital, Kunal Bahl of Snapdeal, and Deepinder Goyal of Zomato – and Bira 91 was on its way to transform the Indian beer ecosystem with an “Imagined in India” craft beer.

Growth and trajectory

Bira 91 has been in business for almost seven years and has, within the period, grown exponentially with unique tastes and offerings. The brand has created a niche for itself and scaled up its market share and revenues beyond expectation. “Blonde and White were our first two variants. In 2017, we did a lot of research and created two additional variants, Strong and Lite. We’ve consistently recorded 150% CAGR annually from 2016 to 2021, and tripled our market share between 2019 and 2021,” says Jain.

Under the “Imagined in India” portfolio, four new limited beers were recently released, namely Bollywood IPA, Kokum Sour, Brown Ale, and Mango Lassi. “The Bollywood IPA variant is a total blockbuster. It is loud, flavourful, and vibrant with a tropical twist, inspired by West Coast IPAs that were born in California. Then we have Kokum Sour which complements the Indian summer by combining the traditional ingredient from the Konkan Coast and the affinity of the Indian palette towards sour flavours and the best sour beers of the world.

“Next is Brown Ale, which is a blend of English Nut Brown Ale and the Antwerpian Amber with strong notes of coconut and vanilla, and finally Mango Lassi, an experimental summer essential that merges Bira 91’s flagship Wheat Ale and a milkshake beer into one flavourful bomb,” he explains. Creating new flavours for the Bira 91 family is a function of consumer feedback, and the taproom in Bengaluru has been a haven of experiments and innovation towards achieving the right mixes for beer lovers. This is why Bira 91 Limited Release Taproom has been awarded the People’s Choice Award for the Best Microbrewery/Taproom of 30 Best Bars in India Awards.

With consumer preferences changing, Bira 91 has access to an ever-expanding market in India where people can now sit over a couple of beers at a bar or crack a bottle open at home. But beyond India, the brand has been able to find some penetration in 18 countries around the world, including the US, UK, Bahrain, Dubai (UAE), Oman, Germany, Singapore, Thailand, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Nepal, Australia, Maldives, Japan, and Sweden. This also means ramping up production to five breweries in India and manufacturing capacity up to 2.4 million cases a month. This is a 6x increase in comparison to 2019. At present, they have five breweries that are operational in Maksi, Nagpur, Kovvur, Mysuru, and Gwalior.

Collaborations and merchandise

As a brand that seeks to constantly connect to consumers, Bira 91 has continued to engage in activities that accommodate members of the public as part of their journey. They have done this through producing exciting merchandise since 2016. The goal, according to Jain, is to create amazing experiences both at home, out of home for their numerous consumers. “It is about lifestyle and deepening the relationship between the brand and the customer. Our Merch store has played an important role in our growth story and enabled a strong connection with consumers.

“It’s almost like an e-commerce operation, replete with its own sourcing, customer service, and product development teams. We have a range of merchandise available including beer and glassware, service ware, as well as apparel and accessories such as wallets, tote bags, laptop sleeves, and so on,” adds Jain. By this move, there’s a deeper connection with members of the public and consumers can better interact with their favourite brand, especially in a country where alcohol advertising is prohibited. Such genius is what has helped Bira 91 to stand out since its establishment.

A number of collaborations have also been entered into with renowned brands in a bid to introduce carefully curated and memorable experiences for consumers. These include a collaboration with boAt, India’s largest consumer wearables’ brand for an exclusive limited-edition collection of three spunky audio devices that are high on functionality and aesthetics. Bira 91 also teamed up with Nicobar, a homegrown lifestyle brand, on a limited-edition capsule of clothing and accessories inspired by the Bira 91 Gold variant.

But that’s not all! Jain explains that these are just notable brands who share the same ideology and customer-centric approach to business. “It’s basically about the consumers. We understand that consumers like to be connected to their brands in more ways than mere transactions. This is how brand equity is built; this is how loyalty is formed – a bond of mutual respect and understanding – where both the brand and the consumer embark on an adventure together to explore different avenues and possibilities. That’s what we’ve achieved,” he says.

Challenges, projections, and future plans

The biggest challenge of the beer industry in India is restrictions on advertising, but innovative entrepreneurs like Jain believe even that is an opportunity. The increasing consciousness of consumers means they can now make intelligent choices, not based on cosmetic advertising like surrogacy, but on “narratives and conversations”. Bira 91 doesn’t engage in surrogate advertising because it considers itself a lifestyle brand, more concerned about engaging its consumers and creating an experience than trying to change their attitudes through media messages.

As Jain puts it, “the Merch shop we created in 2016 is an example of our approach. We have now run it for more than five years and it has become a significant portion of our revenue. I’m not talking about a small portion, but an integral part of our revenue and brand story. We have dedicated teams for purchasing, customer service, and other aspects of a typical e-commerce operation. These are the kinds of things that genuinely reflect the ethos and aspirations of our brand, and are the reason we’re now working towards building a restaurant to continue to create that rich experience for our consumers.”

Beyond collaboration with lifestyle brands in India on many ventures and products, Bira 91 is also looking to further expand into uncharted territories. But Jain understands that winning consumers’ hearts depends on having the perfect product and blends. “Owing to the pandemic, we did not launch many new products in 2020 and 2021. We are now all set to introduce more products than we did in the last five to six years combined. We progressively invested in our product innovation pipeline to get as many new flavours bottled/canned up for wider distribution, going beyond the limited-release beers that consumers can enjoy at our taprooms,” he adds.

Ironhill builds largest microbrewery in the world

Ironhill India in Bangalore is located in the IT hub near Marathahalli and is spread across a lavish 1.3 lac sq. ft. making it the largest microbrewery in the world. With installation art at every corner and an ambience to match, the new outlet will serve eight varieties of original craft beer. The space can accommodate more than 1800+ people at a time and makes a perfect venue for events, exhibitions and a night out as well that can be taken up with social distancing. Since the Bangalore launch the brand has established footprints with a swanky new outlet in Nellore and Rajahmundry as well. Teja Chekuri, Managing Partner, Ironhill India gives more details.

How did Ironhill India begin its journey?

Ironhill, the wonderland of breweries started its journey in 2017 at Vizag. We wanted to be the place for people from all walks of life to chill at, with our range of brews and hip ambiance. This was followed by Vijayawada, Hyderabad, Nellore, Rajahmundry and Bengaluru, with Ironhill Bengaluru being the largest microbrewery in the world. All Ironhill outlets have something unique about them that makes them stand out.

We are also, the biggest microbrewery chain in the country with a total of seven most happening microbreweries across Southern India and gearing up to other parts of the country.

Our aim from the beginning has been simple, to give our patrons a taste of the brewtiful life, with expansive spaces, galvanising ambiance, trippy music, bespoke food menu, and tasty brews to quench the thirst for magical experiences. We cater to everyone, from beer connoisseurs to newbies, regulars to one-offs, colleagues to friends, and we are just getting started!

How different are the challenges managing outlets in the US and those in India?

From a holistic perspective, it is about running all our outlets efficiently and professionally and, in that sense, there is not much of a difference. Where the difference does arise though, is in the culture, the rules and regulations, and the needs of our patron. However, we have learned and dealt with those differences with the aim of providing the best hospitality experience across the board.

Any reason for beginning your journey in the South of India?

Being from this part of the country, we saw the massive scope, the relatively uncrowded hospitality scene, and of course, the lack of awareness about, as well as presence of good microbreweries. So, we entered the microbrewery scene in the South with the sole aim of catering to the local demographic present here and introducing world-class craft beers and indeed a world-class hospitality experience to our patron. With the burgeoning demographic that sought magical experiences, it made complete sense for us to open our microbrewery in the south.

How different are your retail outlets from the competition?

We are all about the beer and food, however, that isn’t to say that our cocktails are far behind. We provide a holistic experience, with larger-than-life spaces, a majestic ambiance, music across genres, an extensive food menu that takes influences from local as well as world cuisine, you name it, and we have. We are all about crafting experiences that are as magical and as perfect as they come.

What is your game plan for India?

Now that we have a solid footing in the southern part of India, we are looking at aggressively expanding and establishing a pan India presence in the next three to five years.

What is the scope for expansion of your craft beer outlets?

We are in expansion mode, and you will hear about us soon from all parts of the country.

What was the impact of Covid on your business?

Undeniably, Covid put a spanner in the works and caused us losses. However, we have a very proactive team and that meant when normalcy was restored, we got back to business on a war footing. Having gone through the tough times relatively unscathed, we are now absolutely gung-ho about the future prospects, as of now business is brisk and we are hitting numbers that are even better than pre-pandemic times.

What kind of styles of beer do you offer at your outlets?

We believe in innovation and experimentation, and hence we launch new brews ever so often. There are staple brews of course like the Wheat Beers, Blonde Ales, Cider, etc, but we also have new beers every month based on the season, like the Mango Ale, Mango Saison, Kiwi Cider, Coco Brown Ale, to name a few.

What kind of food menu do you offer at your outlets?

We have a healthy mix of grub-inspired by local cuisine as well as world cuisine. We have ensured that we have an extensive menu, and we cater to the palates of people from varied backgrounds, so, it would be fair to say, that we have it all.

How important is location for your outlets?

Location is a prerequisite to running a successful business. Space, high footfalls, demographic, spending power, presence of competition, and many such factors are taken into account before deciding on the location of our outlets.

ABD India wins ‘Distiller of the Year’ at Icons of Whisky India 2022

Allied Blenders and Distillers (ABD), maker of iconic products like Officer’s Choice Whisky and Sterling Reserve, won the ‘Distiller of the Year’ high commendation at the Icons of Whisky India 2022.

Instituted by the London publication Whisky Magazine, Icons of Whisky celebrates the people, places and products that make exceptional contributions to the dynamic whisky ecosystem.

Speaking on the occasion, Shekhar Ramamurthy, Executive Deputy Chairman, ABD stated, “It is a great honour for ABD to be recognised by the industry. We have always kept the consumer central to our brands and have phenomenal success in Officer’s Choice, the 3rd largest whisky brand globally, and more recently, Sterling Reserve which is amongst the fastest growing worldwide.”

Paul P John, inducted into Whisky Magazine’s Hall of Fame at the World Whisky Awards 2022

Paul P.John, an entrepreneur by choice, who ventured into the alcoholic beverages industry in 1992 and established John Distilleries in 1996, has not only steered the company to great heights, but also put on the world map India’s capabilities when it comes to producing some of the finest single malts.

Today John Distilleries has been declared the 4th largest liquor company in the country with production at over 8 locations across 7 states in India. The strong portfolio of brands in various liquor categories such as whiskies, brandy, and wines. His flagship brand, Original Choice is one of the top selling brands in India’s popular whisky segment and one of the top 10 selling whiskies in the world with sales exceeding 12 million cases a year.

His zeal to surpass the ordinary and his personal passion for single malts led him to create the Paul John Indian Single Malts.

Paul John Single Malts were launched in the UK in 2012 and they are currently available in over 43 countries. The brand’s several expressions have won over 280 renowned international awards.

And now for his stewardship, Paul P.John, Chairman of John Distilleries Pvt Ltd has been inducted into Whisky Magazine’s Hall of Fame at the World Whisky Awards 2022 held in London in March.

How does it feel to be inducted into Whisky Magazine’s Hall of Fame at the World Whisky Awards 2022?

It is a great honour to be recognised for the work that I have done, and especially for producing premium quality whiskies from India.

What are your future plans in the Scotch space?

We feel there’s a lot of potential be it in domestic or international markets specifically for single malts. Across the world, consumers are not fully aware of drinking or experiencing single malts properly, and as part of our efforts to build awareness of our brand we are helping consumers enjoy single malts better and we find more and more people turning towards such whiskies are their choice of drink.

Do you see a dramatic increase in Scotch sales in the near future?

(Allow us to point out that we don’t call ourselves Scotch, ours are single malts as we do not make our whiskies in Scotland)

And yes we do see a great potential in the sales of single malt whiskies across all markets.

What is the scope for Scotch brands bottled in India?

Both countries are working on bringing down the duties, if that happens there’s a lot of potential but until then there’ll be just a small growth.

How do you plan to increase the footprints of your premium single malt brands in India and abroad?

We’ve been on the job for the last ten years and we’ve had a steady increase in our footprint. We will continue to build brand awareness, venturing into new countries while continuing to build our presence in existing markets, today we are available across 40 countries in the world.

Which countries are you focussed on for your brands and why?

Mainly UK, USA, rest of Europe and Australia, and of course India.

What are your comments on the recent FTA with Australia?

We welcome more competition.

Which countries would you like to see India signing FTAs and why?

We are fine with working with whatever our government decides.

Are you looking at other segments like Tequila, Gin and Vodka?

Yes, we are planning to launch a premium gin shortly.

What is the next big award you hope to win?

Consumers, accepting the brand is the best award and recognition we can possibly get.

Neha Gupta Launches Second Restaurant – Nineteen78

Architect, Interior Designer, Restaurateur, and Founder of Beyond Designs Bistro, Neha Gupta has launched a second restaurant. The new culinary offering is titled, Nineteen78, hinting at the classical influence of the cuisine on offer.

Propelled by the success of Beyond Designs Bistro, Neha takes assured steps to expand her culinary brand. The new restaurant is located at the popular Select CITYWALK, New Delhi.

Having mastered the art of offering a carefully crafted couture experience with the Bistro, she has now launched a prêt affair with Nineteen78. From a relaxed and elegant dining affair at the Bistro that is every bit cherishable, her patrons now have a chance to grab an equally memorable meal at the new restaurant.

The 48-seater multi-cuisine restaurant presents a delectable mix of European, Asian and Coastal cuisines from Vietnam and Sri Lanka. The menu sees the trained chefs revisiting certain classic dishes while also serving up some modern experimental fare. From Caesar and Fattoush salads with a twist to Chicken in spinach sauce with Orzo salad and grilled vegetables; from Sweet and spicy Hong Kong ginger fish to Caramelized dry Vietnamese chicken, and prawn linguini, Sliced lamb in hoisin sauce, there are several finger-licking options to choose from. Raspberry pie with vanilla ice cream, apple crumble & ice cream Chocolate devil cake, and many more make up the dessert menu. The restaurant also has a bar attached, offering a complete dining experience.

There is also an extensive breakfast menu with healthy as well as indulgent selections. The interiors designed by Neha and her husband Sachin Gupta of Beyond Designs, are a youthful mélange of contemporary styles. The boutique vibe of the restaurant is accentuated with colourful and quirky art and a fun bunch of lights made of steel and fiber. The marble tables with metal cast bases are paired with retro-style wooden chairs and sofa seating.

While embracing a contemporary sensibility, the restaurant and the gastronomic experience it offers retain a vintage soul.

Have you been to these microbreweries in Bengaluru? If not, you should

In the late 1980s, when Ramada Pub off Church Street, next to the erstwhile popular Premier Bookshop, started vending ‘draught’ or ‘draft’ beer in mugs, it signalled the arrival of not just Bangalore’s but arguably India’s s first-ever pub, thanks to the ingenuity of Hari Khoday, who was known more for his XXX Rum then. A mug of beer cost only Rs. 2.75 paise with peanuts thrown in. It was a place where you could guzzle beer, not from a bottle, but in a mug, dispensed from a tap, connected to barrels of brewed beer got from the distillery. The concept of microbrewery came in much later. Ramada Pub was a tiny place where you jostled for space and guzzled beer with some loud music in the background.

Around the same time, The Pub, renamed later as NASA (guess one got spaced out just drinking beer then) got launched on Church Street and the music and the dim lighting gave fillip to beer drinkers to guzzle more. The Pub drew the upwardly mobile and then came Black Cadillac on Residency road which played rock music and also had regular gigs. I remember Vijay Mallya hosting some liquor-based events here for the media. These were happening places. Then there was Peco’s, Scottish Pub, Underground, Downtown and the like, all in and around Brigade Road, Residency Road, M.G. Road, becoming the city’s ‘beerholes’, if one may coin that term. And then from nowhere pubs started mushrooming across the hotspots of the city, earning Bangalore the moniker ‘Pub Capital of India’.

The city is a cauldron of cosmopolitan culture, with the tech crowd descending from all over the country and elsewhere too. The techies gave Bangalore a new edge and soon, pubs had to re-invent themselves, and voila there was the birth of microbreweries. The pubs of now are very distinct, trying to cater to the hip crowd, setting trends in not just the social drinking habit, but in cuisine, in music, in events and what-have-you. At one time, pub crawl was quite popular, now not so. With an estimated over 500 pubs in the city, these ‘beer-holes’ have to be up there to cater to the discerning and demanding beer connoisseurs and they are, mind it. From pubs to microbreweries, Bangalore or Bengaluru has indeed come a long way from the days of Ramada. Here are some of the new age breweries you can check out to get a taste of the beer world.

Geist Brewing Factory, the pioneer

Among the first to come up with a brewing factory has been Geist. It was in 2006, Geist was incorporated, thanks to Narayan and Paul and later Mohan, software guys who plunge to brew some of the finest beers Bangalore has known. Initially they made 300-400 batches of beer and then when the microbreweries in the city became ‘in’, Geist was right there. When The Biere Club opened in 2013 and later Byg Brewski, Geist became the catalyst. As the pubs grew, Geist set up its own brewery and supplies draft beer to Bootlegger, Hangover and Tipsy Bull, among many other restaurants and pubs.

The name ‘Geist’ comes from the German word ‘zeitgeist’, which is used to define “the general intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of an era”. The sentiment perfectly captures the evolution of Indian beer drinkers, and the resulting rise of the discerning Indian beer enthusiast and you bet, Bengalureans, by birth or otherwise, fall in that category.

To spread their love for beer, they set up their own Geist Brewing Factory – Restaurant and Beer Garden on Old Madras Road, serving their signature crafted beers – Geist Weiss Guy, Geist Kamacitra, Geist Rauch-a-Fella, Geist Marzen, Geist Golden Ale, Geist Witty Wit, Geist Stouter Space stout and Geist Uncle Dunkel. The ambience here is just about perfect to down a beer or two under the shade of a huge banyan tree.

The Geist Rauch-a-Fella is a smoked wheat beer, inspired by the famous smoke beers of Bamberg, while the Geist Stouter Space has delightful notes of chocolate and aromas of vanilla pods. Inspired by Luponic Distortion from Firestone Walker, the Geist Golden Ale series is designed to showcase different hop varieties. The best way to find out how all their beers taste is to go check it out, right?

The Biere Club, welcome to the club

When it opened in 2010, it started a new trend in the pub city – microbrewing and it caught on like raging fire. The Biere Club located, coincidentally on Vittal Mallya road (the man who built United Breweries, later Vijay Mallya gave Kingfisher global branding) got Bengalureans interested in microbrewing, vending beers including wheat, stout, lager and Belgian style ale. They have even experimented with ‘ragi’, locally grown millet, but one must try out the combination of strawberry & vanilla, lemon & chilli and bayleaf. The Moscow Mule created with ale and ginger ale is a drink that finds favour during summers. The Biere Club has another branch in the IT belt, called The Biere Street.

Byg Brewski, Asia’s largest brewpub

This is supposedly Asia’s largest premium brewpub – Byg Brewski Brewing Company or simply Byg Brewski, which is located in Hennur, away from the central business district. It is massive, with a sprawling 65,000 square feet of space which can seat about 3,000 people at a time in five different experience zones. Truly, the experience makes people come back for more and not just for the home-made craft beers. The ambience is an experience in itself with lush greenery and a lake within and a waterfall to boot. The microbrewery serves some amazing beers including Byg Wit (a medium bodied beer, low in bitterness with fruity esters); Byg Hefeweizen, a Bavarian style wheat beer; Byg Triple, a Belgian style strong ale; New Zealand Pilsner; Byg IPA, West Coast style IPA brewed with American hops; Coffee Chocolate Stout, a dark rich decadent stout and many more for one to quench one’s thirst and to experience some of the best brews this side of the world.

Arbor Brewing Company, everything American about it

Decade-old Arbor Brewing Company or simply ABC is supposedly India’s first American craft brewery. This has origins in Arbor Brewing Company, founded by Matt Greff who pioneered American craft beer revolution at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Having tasted American craft beer while studying at the University of Michigan, Gaurak Sikka headed straight to the ‘Pub Capital’ to launch ABC in 2012 and there has been no looking back. In 2018, Sikka took Arbor Brewing Company to Saligao in Goa and both places are rocking for their American craft beer and everything American. The wooden interiors give the place an authentic look, while what can one say about the beers ABC vends – Bangalore Bliss; Phat Abbot Tripel; Smooth Criminal; Rare Earth Lager; Michael Faricy Stout among others. ABC is the place to try highly innovative beer cocktails such as Wheat on Wheat (Ketel one vodka with mango juice, orgeat syrup and Bangalore Bliss); Chocolate Stout Old Fashioned (Michael Faricy’s Irish Stout, Johnnie Walker Red Label stirred together with chocolate and a hint of chilly; and summer refreshment in the form of 3 Spiced Mules (Pineapple and fresh ginger with Johnnie Walker Red Label served tall with Phat Abbot Tripel). ABC offers a full bar and there is a dance floor for one to dance through the night!

Toit, popular hangout

From night to Toit, it’s a beer walk. Toit in Indiranagar is an out and out brew pub, brewing a revolutionary culture, as they word it. With the promise of some bodacious brews, fabulous foods and a supreme brew pub experience, Toit has gone beyond that. In fact, the revolution has moved to Mumbai and Pune too. Toit claims all their beers are made only with natural ingredients; imported malts, the hippest of hops and the most eukaryotic of yeast, never using any enzymes, chemicals, colouring agents, artificial flavouring or preservatives, “because we want every sip to be nothing short of wholesome, heavenly, beer”. Using the unique and exotic flavours of local fruits, rice, wheat, and spices, this is Toit’s contribution to the world’s great craft beers such as Toit Nitro Stout (a very dark, full-bodied, roasty, malty ale); Toit TinTin (Belgian style fruity ale); Toit India Pale Ale (a bitter, highly hopped, English style ale); Toit Hefeweizen (a full bodied refreshing Bavarian); Toit Basmati Blonde (a light, crisp and refreshing ale, they call it a love child of India’s Basmati rice from which it gets its lightness, colour and floral aroma); and the city’s own Benga-Lager-U (a clean lager with complex maltiness and subtle spicy notes). Said to be one of the most popular brew haunts, it gives a high like no other.

Windmills, energising in a gentle way

Celebrating its decade-young journey in microbrewing is Windmills Craft Works in Whitefield. Known simply as Windmills, it is an upscale pub which has a jazz theatre where artistes from around the world have performed. On tap, they vend Hefeweizen, a Golden Ale, A Stout, 1-2 IPAs and New England IPA. For the tech crowd which makes up its clientele, Windmills offers a ‘boutique’ experience and the techies swear by it, not minding its ‘pricey’ menu. On the terrace, it serves North Indian fare, totally high end offering with a spectacular view of the sprawling tech city.

XOOX Brewmill, its Zooks, ok?

Coming to Koramangala which is peppered with some of the best restaurants and watering holes, there is XOOX Brewmill (don’t know how they came to pronounce it Zooks) which vends artisanal beers and cocktails. Spread across three floors, Zooks, is a live craft brewing space, converted from an old factory. The brewery offers eight styles of craft beers and signature cocktails like the XOOX G&T — a gin, martini bianco, Campari, red wine reduction with grape, apple juice, and tonic water, the C&C (Coffee & Conversation) — gin, black coffee, rose water, orange bitters, ginger ale and The Asian Wife, an interesting cocktail made with vodka, lemongrass syrup, lychee juice, lime juice and lemongrass haze.

BierGarten, so al-fresco

When in Koramangala, check out BierGarten, a sprawling 14,000 sq. ft and an airy, al-fresco seating across two floors. To go with this perfect setting, they’ve got about eight beer variants on tap with traditional German-style Hefeweizen, a dark Dunkel and Amber Lager being the most moving ones. They also have an outlet in Whitefield and a menu that boasts European-style cuisine.

Bier Library, for the ‘beerworm’

From BierGarten, we hop to the Bier Library, which has a beautiful open space and seating with the view of a koi pond located bang in the middle. There’s a cozy reading corner if you want your reading to transport you to another world, yes, of course, drinking the well-crafted beer and that includes a Red Ale, a Spicy Wheat Beer, and a Double IPA. They are also quite well known for their signatures that include Wittle Wit, Ale-O-Drama and Further Lager.

Druid Garden, you will like their potions

Moving to North Bangalore, which is just about seeing some fancy restaurants and pubs coming up, right perched on top is Druid Garden which has a built-in microbrewery that is run by a Chez Brew Master. Naturally, the ingredients are all sourced from Czech Republic and Germany and use recipes that have been tried and tested for years. Since they’ve opened, they’ve introduced 6 beers – Czech Pilsner, Bohemian Dunkel, Indian Pale Ale and a Basmati Lager among others.

District 6, zoned out

From one end of the city, we move to District 6, an upscale microbrewery that offers both fine dining and classic brews. With rustic and modern interiors and a blend of refined fresh German style brews, District 6 is a quaint brewery where you won’t have to shout out while in conversation with your drinking partner, the music just being right, not raucous. The microbrewery offers European, Indian and Chinese cuisine, but the beers are German-style. The brewery features open-air ducts and brewing equipment. True to its number 6, the brewery has a beer tank area; a brewery area; outdoor seating; front kitchen; public and private dining spaces.

Bengaluru is a trend setter and people from all over the world converge here for its cosmopolitan outlook and culture, unmindful of traffic. The city is peppered with so many watering holes, that one tends to forget the potholes, the chaotic traffic and work-related stress. Cheers to ‘namma Bengaluru’